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You need to add a financial analyst to your team, and you’d like to keep your search as short and focused as you possibly can without compromising the outcome. As the old saying goes, you can have a task done quickly, cheaply, or well, but not all three. And in this case, you need all three. So what steps can you take to target the right kinds of candidates and find a shortcut to success? Here are a few signs that you’ve found a likely contender. These traits suggest that your new analyst will fit in well with the team and start producing right away.

She’s Self Directed

Watch out for candidates who want any job at all, not just this job. If your applicant can tell you five things that attracted to her to this specific position and your specific organization, that means you’re on the right track. This is a candidate who’s done some research on the company and the role, and she’s made your job easy by pre-emptively measuring her skills against your needs, and vice versa. If she’s on the fence or has yet to be convinced, this candidate won’t hesitate to ask you anything she needs to know. She’ll grill you just as much—or more—than you grill her. And if she likes what she hears, she’s probably the right candidate for you.

Her Experience Matches your Requirements (without Going Over or Under)

You need an analyst at the entry level with the ambition and sharp mind that will make up for her lack of real-world experience. Or maybe you need an analyst who can take the reins and step into the role with little to no training. Or maybe you need a proven leader who can take on this job while simultaneously managing others and driving organizational change. Whatever your required level of experience, think twice before you accept an under or overqualified applicant. This is a recipe for a mismatch, and if your candidate leaves within one year, replacing her can be an expensive headache.

Her Ambitions Align With Your Future Staffing Needs

Almost any qualified candidate can thrive in this position for a year, or maybe two. But you need a candidate who will stay with the company for five years or more. And if your applicant is driven and ambitious, that means you’ll need to provide the opportunity she’ll be looking for when it’s time for a promotion. Where would you like to take this company in the future? Do your plans line up with her plans for her own career?

For more on how to identify and attract the ideal candidate for your open financial position, contact the professional staffing experts at Tech Needs.

 

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