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Glassdoor is often the first website job seekers visit when they consider working for a company. During the last couple of years, employees have flocked to Glassdoor to post about their experiences at their current and former jobs. Glassdoor allows for anonymity for their reviewers, and frustrated employees or former employees have used the site to blast negative feedback about their job, co-workers, bosses, and working environment. 

 

These details may or may not be completely true, but that is not a reason your company should ignore Glassdoor. Tech Needs took a proactive approach, and our Glassdoor profile offers comprehensive information about who we are and what we do. We also made it known to our team that we are open to their feedback.

 

Glassdoor Best Practice #1

 

We have a strong rating on Glassdoor, and the reviews posted there are from current and former staff members. You should not require your employees to write reviews on your behalf. Give them information and let them take it from there. For example, here is a sample message you can share with your team:

 

“Our company is now on Glassdoor! Your feedback is important to our company culture and the decisions we make for our employees. You can find our Glassdoor page here (link to it), and if you choose to do so, you can share your experiences about what it is like to work here. Thank you.”

 

By doing this, you might discover that there are some challenges that several team members are experiencing, such as a particular tool that everyone uses but not everyone completely understands. Encouraging reviews from your team can bring some issues to light, and can even provide some solutions to in-house pain points. 

 

One of the biggest challenges for companies is how and when to respond to reviews. The good ones are easy. The negative ones are tougher. 

 

Glassdoor Best Practice #2

 

It’s time-consuming to visit review sites regularly and to respond to reviews, but we believe it’s worth the effort. If there is no response to a negative review, it could look like you don’t care. Job seekers will take into account reviews and responses when researching a company.  

 

When responding to reviews, it’s best not to turn this into a back and forth – they posted something negative about you, so you respond with something negative back. Most responses can be as simple as: “I am sorry you had that experience. I would be happy to have a conversation with you about it. Please contact me at …”

 

It’s tough to get a review removed from sites whose primary function – and income – is sharing reviews. However, if a review about your company is blatantly offensive or threatening, you should contact Glassdoor or the review site to let them know. If Glassdoor deems it unacceptable or not an actual review about your company, they will likely remove it. 

 

Job seekers are not the only ones looking at Glassdoor. We determined we no longer wanted to work with a client based on feedback from their employees shared on Glassdoor. We saw a pattern of behavior we were not comfortable with, so we ended the relationship.

 

A couple of years passed, and we were contacted by the company. They said there were working hard to change the culture of the company and wanted to meet with us. The first thing we brought up was the Glassdoor rating being the reason we stopped doing business with them. We said if they were dedicated to building their culture, we want to see new reviews reflecting that. Most of the current reviews still had the same negative feedback. 

 

We told them they are not going to get the new talent they are seeking without some positive feedback from employees. Going back to the first best practice in this post, let it be known that you are open to and would appreciate feedback from your team.

 

Glassdoor makes it very easy for someone to leave a review. Encourage, but don’t require reviews from your team. New, positive reviews will encourage more job seekers to want to work with you. 

 

Glassdoor is often the first website job seekers visit when they consider working for a company. During the last couple of years, employees have flocked to Glassdoor to post about their experiences at their current and former jobs. Glassdoor allows for anonymity for their reviewers, and frustrated employees or former employees have used the site to blast negative feedback about their job, co-workers, bosses, and working environment. 

 

These details may or may not be completely true, but that is not a reason your company should ignore Glassdoor. Tech Needs took a proactive approach, and our Glassdoor profile offers comprehensive information about who we are and what we do. We also made it known to our team that we are open to their feedback.

 

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